Tag Archives: quick and dirty

Preparation of my upcoming exhibitions in Paris

IMG_1754I’ve been lately hard at work preparing the two exhibitions that will take place in Paris next week.

I feel very fortunate to have the help and support of many people for these two HUGE events. To name but a few, Sony US and Sony France (in particular, Kayla, Astrid and Romain) have helped a great deal with the marketing materials, press releases and more. Chritophe Marlot and José Alcantara were of course instrumental in letting me show my work in their galleries, thnak you both! And Christine and Philippe for their incredible help and support in way too many ways to describe here.IMG_1755

You will find higher two photographs of the flyers and posters that Sony France printed. These will be sent to their partner pro photography stores in Paris. don’t they look great!? 🙂

Please click the following link to access Sony France Press Release (in French): Press Release Sony France.

Details of the show on the flyers and in the text below:

Kusch+CO

25 rue de Verneuil

75007 Paris

France Thibault-ROLAND-flyer-US-KuschBJF

27 rue de Verneuil

75007 Paris

France

Thibault-ROLAND-flyer-US-BJF

Below are some of the photographs I will show next week right after signing and numbering them (they are all of course limited editions):

18594_1602552453348086_4490956993676541288_n 11350838_1602552910014707_4146764417238019095_n 20150502_121127 20150502_122451 20150502_12211520150502_121127 20150502_125413

And these two are the largest prints I have ever had printed to date: ~50×150 cm! (~20×60″!)

 

20150502_124403

20150502_123758 20150502_123831 For those of you who wonder how my limited editions are, I sign and number them on the front side (see higher) and use a seal on each one of them, and add my signature, number in the series and the title on the back, see below:

20150502_121037 20150502_121748 20150502_122056 20150502_124316

Building a technical camera – Part IV

20150322_130154Step Four of Building a technical camera: adding left/right shifting to the back element

Last time, I showed you the results of milling out a chunk of the back element of the Fuji camera. Today, I’ll show you why I did it, and how to mount different parts together and insure they are perfectly parallel or perpendicular to each other.

For that particular step, I bought a cheap Chinese precision rail system on eBay. For $8 USD, it’s hard to get a better system that can be modified, drilled, cut or tapped. The following picture shows you exactly what this part looks like before modifying and mounting on the camera.

DSC01151First step was to take apart the rail itself (with the screw sticking out of the slot), from the support piece that is originally meant to attach on the tripod head. In the final design, the parts will be flipped: the rail will become the support (attached to the camera, see below) and the other part with the precise movement knob and the stopper. The latter part will be modified so I can attach a support plate for the camera.20150404_192705

You will find below a few pictures that I shot while adjusting the rail to the camera so that these two part are perfectly perpendicular to each other. This step is very delicate, because the slightest misalignment between them will lead to the sensor plane not being perpendicular to the lenses, effectively creating unwanted tilt. 20150404_192717

To make sure the parts were perpendicular, I used the precision of the milling machine and an indicator, see below:

20150404_192732

Just so you have a better sense of what things will look like eventually, here is a photograph of the back element with the inverted support part that I’ll drill and tap in order to mound the camera standard:20150404_193117No a few photographs of the camera with the rail system, where you can see how left/right shift will work:

DSC01173 DSC01171 DSC01164 DSC01160 Next step:

Drill the rear standard support (part with the two knobs in the pictures higher).

Conclusions:

1/ this was one of the most delicate but easiest steps so far. Easiest when you have the right tools, but these are hard to come by and even harder to let a machinist let you use his toys 🙂

2/ I found a solution to add rear swing (left/right tilt) by ordering a precise optical rotating stage for about $80 USD from China. I’ll give you the details in a later post if you are interested (please use the comment below if so). I’ll first work on a prototype that won’t have swing, see how it goes and then add the rotating stage.

Building a technical camera – Part III

20150404_183123Step Three of Building a technical camera: milling out part of the back element

Good news! I was able to modify the back element of the Fuji GX camera that I took apart some time ago (see here for details about taking this guy apart).

Did I mention this project is VERY exciting? Yes? Well, I’m even more excited, and using power tools is something I really enjoy.

And so I was really happy to use a milling machine (see picture higher; big fancy machine) in order to remove parts of the back element of the camera in order to make a nice platform I will use to fix a rail for left/right (pano) movement.

ATTENTION: I would like to stress out that you should not use power tools and machine aluminum (or any other material for that matter) yourself if you do not know how to use such tools. They are extremely dangerous if not used properly, and they can injure badly, or worse… So please be careful, and let the “pros” handle them 🙂

As a reminder, you’ll find below the picture of the camera “skeleton” showing with red arrows the parts of the back element that need to be removed (milled):

Sans titre-1 copie

You will see in the next few photographs the part after milling. For those who are not familiar with machining, you can see where I removed metal because it looks all shiny / silver. As I mentioned before, I had to remove the posts for the screws entirely, as well as some of the front and back vertical stands to make a nice leveled platform.

Let me point out that the level must be as close to perfection as possible, if one want to ensure movement in the horizontal plane rather than having a left/right shifted image that will be higher or lower than the previously shot image.

20150404_183158 20150404_183140 20150404_183130Let’s do a comparison of before and after milling:

11046131_10153153202593485_1501836423_o20150322_130154 20150322_130218Next step:

Fix the rail system where you can see the nuts in the last two pictures. This rail will be used in order to shift the camera left and right in order to make panoramas. This is another very delicate step, as the rail needs to be perfectly parallel to the stands of the back element (that is perfectly perpendicular to the optical axis), unless it will introduce a change in the position of the sensor plane while shifting, therefore leading to unwanted blur in the final image.

Conclusions:

1/ I had lots of fun milling the back part of the Fuji camera. Making chips and machining using tools like a milling machine is incredibly fun, but you have to be very careful and need to know what you’re doing, so PLEASE don’t do it yourself if you have not been taught how to.

2/ Now that’s it, even if I wanted to go back and put the camera in it’s original state I could not. I am not overly concerned the project won’t work, but when you take one like this you have to keep in your mind you may waste a lot of money and time. But it’s a risk I’m willing to take because it’s fun, and also because the goals are well worth the risks 😉

3/ You have to plan well in advance about the next steps you’ll take, if only because you have to order parts which may come from China and take time to get there. I have to admit I am better advanced than I’m showing right now, and things are looking good for now.

Building a technical camera – Part II

20150322_125637

Step Two of Building a technical camera: taking apart a GX680

For those of you who did not see my first post about it, you can find it here. In a few words, after many discussions with my photographer friend Satoru Murata, I decided to throw myself into a new project: building a technical camera that I can use to mount almost any lens on a Sony a7/II/R/S body, much like the Cambo Actus system, but on the cheap side.

Getting to it now. You will find higher and below a few pictures of the (very functional) Fuji GX6800 III I bought recently and took apart these last few days…

Scary, right? 🙂

Because it was the first time I took one apart, I actually ended up removing more parts than I should have, but I guess it does not matter too much since I’ll show you next that I basically milled (cut out with a power tool) entire parts of the camera (already done) and I’m now too committed to go back and put things back together.20150322_125815

To get to the bare minimum of the camera (front, back elements and railing, see the terrible phone picture below), all I needed to do was de-attach the bellows from the front and back elements, and mostly to unscrew and remove the camera body (back element) from the railing system.

11046131_10153153202593485_1501836423_oThe idea now is to keep the front standard as is, because it has all sorts of movements (tilt, shift, swing) for the lens. However, I want to modify (mill) the back element in order to remove the different parts with red arrows on the picture below: a couple of posts that were used to screw the body on and the front and rear metal parts on which it rested.

The goal is to create a platform on which I can fix a 2-way rail. This rail will eventually be used as a support for the camera board and it will allow for left/right shifting of the camera (great for shooting panos, blue arrows on the picture below).

Sans titre-1 copieI’m also thinking about adding swing to the back of the camera. The way I see it, it will require a precision rotating stage (similar to what can be found in science labs doing optics), but I’m having issues finding something cheap and precise enough. Ideally, it also has to be about 1 to 2 inches (~25-50mm) in diameter and I would like to have: a knob to rotate the stage, and one to lock in it place. It also needs to handle 3-4 pounds (~2kg) of weight. If you have suggestions, please fire away!

Conclusions of this part:

1/ Taking this guy apart was easy peasy, and probably the most straightforward part of the project. I can’t stress enough that I’m happy I’ll never have to put the Fuji back together. It seems now that I have multiple small parts all over my work table, and I have no clue where most of them would go 🙂

2/ Next part is using a milling machine to reduce some of the back element in order to create a nice resting platform. I’ll show you some pictures of this step, but if you are not familiar with how to work these machines, please don’t go ahead on your own repeating what I’ll do. You can get hurt. Badly. If not worse.

3/ If you are aware of where to acquire new or used (small 1 to 2” dia) rotating stages (with a precision adjustment knob and able to carry ~3-4 pounds), please shoot me a message. I am currently designing the next steps, and would love to get my hands on one. Worse case scenario, I’ll start with a prototype that does not have swing if I can’t find one.

4/ As usual, if you have questions or ideas, send them my way!

Till next time!

Building a technical camera – Part I

$_57Fuji GX680 III basic body with rear and front elements and bellows. Missing lens, film back and viewfinder.

Step One of Building a technical camera

I have a new project: the ultimate DIY camera fun.

After much discussion with my buddy Satoru Murata, I decided to take on a project for the next few weeks. I will share with you some of the steps I will take into building a technical view camera… of sorts.

For those who are not familiar with such cameras, you can find a description here and a sketch below: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/View_camera

In a few words, this camera is made of a front board which holds a lens, and bellows that ensure the image coming from the lens goes without interference to a back element containing film or a digital sensor (there are also other types of capturing media but no need to go into such details here). What makes this type of camera special is the ability to move the front (and back) element in order to obtain large amounts of tilt and shift.

If you have been following me for a little while, you know that I use tilt and especially shift in my work, and sometimes using such special lenses in particular situations (for instance when you find yourself very close to the subject). For those who are into technicalities, another limitation of regular modern style T/S lenses is that movement happens at the front of the camera and not at the back. Back movement is however preferable because moving the front element changes the position of the image circle, and it usually is better to tilt (in particular) the rear element rather than the lens in order to avoid such changes in image circle position.

Now, you also now that I use Sony cameras for my work, as well as different sorts of lenses, ranging from modern and old Full Frame lenses to 30-ish years old Medium Format lenses (and I even also do Large Format film for fun). All these lenses are great, and MF provides a larger image circle, meaning that I can do larger movements than with FF lenses. Unfortunately, none of the adapters available on the market allow for full access to the MF lenses image circle, and some of them simply cannot be used, period (such as Mamiya RZ67). It is also impossible to use LF lenses on modern FF or MF dSLRs and backs.

So here is the idea: build a technical camera that will let me mount ANY (and I insist on ANY) lens (FF, MF, LF) on a modern digital FF mirrorless dSLR or MF back, and give TILT and SHIFT movement both at the front and back elements.

After some research online, I found that people can hack a Fuji GX680 body into doing something like this.

So I present you a new member in the family: a cheap (~$200 USD) Fuji GX680 III body which I will start stripping off its different elements in order to keep only the base body and moving elements.

$_573245Next steps to come, after I removed all the unnecessary parts! 🙂

On a different note, I’ll need to find this camera a name after it’s finished… let me know if you have suggestions! 🙂

New architectural photograph coming soon

10295073_10152794782118485_2926526480416932124_oI finally finished a long exposure image I’ve been working on for the last 3 weeks…
Iit’s a 6 photographs panorama that I took in Boston recently (each image is about 5 minutes exposure and 36MP, shot with my new @Sony ‪#‎a7R‬ camera), that I stitched together in post to make a final file about 10,000 x 8,000 pixels, 16 bits.
After upgrading my computer system, I finally nailed it! I so needed fresh “blood” to handle 500MO tif files 😀
Will share soon~ish…

In the mean time, you see here an image representing the finished picture, with some of the hard selections I made in post-processing in Photoshop.
I know it’s pretty abstract right now, but if you look hard, the picture is there, I promise 😉