Tag Archives: photograph

Joint exhibits in Paris at Kusch+CO and BJF Galleries June 2015.

Thibault-ROLAND-poster_resizeI am very happy to announce that I will show photographs in two galleries in Paris (France) for joint solo shows in June, supported by Sony USA and Sony France. Both galleries are located in the prestigious Distric “Carré Rive Gauche” located near the Assemblée Nationale. The exhibits are part of the annual district event “Metamorphosis“.

Each will present two aspects of my work: architectural and seascape photography for Kusch+CO and BJF galleries, respectively.

The opening ceremony will be at Kusch+CO Tuesday June 2nd 5pm-9pm.

For more details, please see below and flyers.

Kusch+CO

25 rue de Verneuil

75007 Paris

France

Thibault-ROLAND-flyer-US-Kusch

BJF

27 rue de Verneuil

75007 Paris

France

Thibault-ROLAND-flyer-US-BJF

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CameraPixo Publication & Editor’s Choice Award

CameraPixo052015

I’m really happy to announce that one of my newest photographs from my Isolation series,  has been published by the great Camerapixo editions.

If you don’t know them already, please click on the image above. I’m also very happy to have been published alongside wonderful artists such as Ajit Menon Iurie Belegurschi, Jose Ramos, Philip Gunkel, Sal Virji, Stian Klo and so many more!

CAMERAPIXO NATURE 03 PUBLISHED

Building a technical camera – Part III

20150404_183123Step Three of Building a technical camera: milling out part of the back element

Good news! I was able to modify the back element of the Fuji GX camera that I took apart some time ago (see here for details about taking this guy apart).

Did I mention this project is VERY exciting? Yes? Well, I’m even more excited, and using power tools is something I really enjoy.

And so I was really happy to use a milling machine (see picture higher; big fancy machine) in order to remove parts of the back element of the camera in order to make a nice platform I will use to fix a rail for left/right (pano) movement.

ATTENTION: I would like to stress out that you should not use power tools and machine aluminum (or any other material for that matter) yourself if you do not know how to use such tools. They are extremely dangerous if not used properly, and they can injure badly, or worse… So please be careful, and let the “pros” handle them 🙂

As a reminder, you’ll find below the picture of the camera “skeleton” showing with red arrows the parts of the back element that need to be removed (milled):

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You will see in the next few photographs the part after milling. For those who are not familiar with machining, you can see where I removed metal because it looks all shiny / silver. As I mentioned before, I had to remove the posts for the screws entirely, as well as some of the front and back vertical stands to make a nice leveled platform.

Let me point out that the level must be as close to perfection as possible, if one want to ensure movement in the horizontal plane rather than having a left/right shifted image that will be higher or lower than the previously shot image.

20150404_183158 20150404_183140 20150404_183130Let’s do a comparison of before and after milling:

11046131_10153153202593485_1501836423_o20150322_130154 20150322_130218Next step:

Fix the rail system where you can see the nuts in the last two pictures. This rail will be used in order to shift the camera left and right in order to make panoramas. This is another very delicate step, as the rail needs to be perfectly parallel to the stands of the back element (that is perfectly perpendicular to the optical axis), unless it will introduce a change in the position of the sensor plane while shifting, therefore leading to unwanted blur in the final image.

Conclusions:

1/ I had lots of fun milling the back part of the Fuji camera. Making chips and machining using tools like a milling machine is incredibly fun, but you have to be very careful and need to know what you’re doing, so PLEASE don’t do it yourself if you have not been taught how to.

2/ Now that’s it, even if I wanted to go back and put the camera in it’s original state I could not. I am not overly concerned the project won’t work, but when you take one like this you have to keep in your mind you may waste a lot of money and time. But it’s a risk I’m willing to take because it’s fun, and also because the goals are well worth the risks 😉

3/ You have to plan well in advance about the next steps you’ll take, if only because you have to order parts which may come from China and take time to get there. I have to admit I am better advanced than I’m showing right now, and things are looking good for now.

Building a technical camera – Part II

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Step Two of Building a technical camera: taking apart a GX680

For those of you who did not see my first post about it, you can find it here. In a few words, after many discussions with my photographer friend Satoru Murata, I decided to throw myself into a new project: building a technical camera that I can use to mount almost any lens on a Sony a7/II/R/S body, much like the Cambo Actus system, but on the cheap side.

Getting to it now. You will find higher and below a few pictures of the (very functional) Fuji GX6800 III I bought recently and took apart these last few days…

Scary, right? 🙂

Because it was the first time I took one apart, I actually ended up removing more parts than I should have, but I guess it does not matter too much since I’ll show you next that I basically milled (cut out with a power tool) entire parts of the camera (already done) and I’m now too committed to go back and put things back together.20150322_125815

To get to the bare minimum of the camera (front, back elements and railing, see the terrible phone picture below), all I needed to do was de-attach the bellows from the front and back elements, and mostly to unscrew and remove the camera body (back element) from the railing system.

11046131_10153153202593485_1501836423_oThe idea now is to keep the front standard as is, because it has all sorts of movements (tilt, shift, swing) for the lens. However, I want to modify (mill) the back element in order to remove the different parts with red arrows on the picture below: a couple of posts that were used to screw the body on and the front and rear metal parts on which it rested.

The goal is to create a platform on which I can fix a 2-way rail. This rail will eventually be used as a support for the camera board and it will allow for left/right shifting of the camera (great for shooting panos, blue arrows on the picture below).

Sans titre-1 copieI’m also thinking about adding swing to the back of the camera. The way I see it, it will require a precision rotating stage (similar to what can be found in science labs doing optics), but I’m having issues finding something cheap and precise enough. Ideally, it also has to be about 1 to 2 inches (~25-50mm) in diameter and I would like to have: a knob to rotate the stage, and one to lock in it place. It also needs to handle 3-4 pounds (~2kg) of weight. If you have suggestions, please fire away!

Conclusions of this part:

1/ Taking this guy apart was easy peasy, and probably the most straightforward part of the project. I can’t stress enough that I’m happy I’ll never have to put the Fuji back together. It seems now that I have multiple small parts all over my work table, and I have no clue where most of them would go 🙂

2/ Next part is using a milling machine to reduce some of the back element in order to create a nice resting platform. I’ll show you some pictures of this step, but if you are not familiar with how to work these machines, please don’t go ahead on your own repeating what I’ll do. You can get hurt. Badly. If not worse.

3/ If you are aware of where to acquire new or used (small 1 to 2” dia) rotating stages (with a precision adjustment knob and able to carry ~3-4 pounds), please shoot me a message. I am currently designing the next steps, and would love to get my hands on one. Worse case scenario, I’ll start with a prototype that does not have swing if I can’t find one.

4/ As usual, if you have questions or ideas, send them my way!

Till next time!

New Publication: Landscape Photography Magazine (UK)

landscape-pageI was glad to learn recently that one of my only color photographs is published in the great UK Landscape Photography Magazine, issue 49.
It’s a picture I shot in Monument Valley in the USA. Truly one of my fondest memories of my first (and longest) road trip in the USA: about a month, and 20 000 km. Epic! 😉

Have you ever done such a road trip? If so, I’d be curious to hear about the little gems you found on the road. Did you find not-so-famous locations you’d recommend others to visit? Please share them in the comments below if you do!landscape-cover

Upcoming Long Exposure Workshop in Maine

flyer-4 copyWell, seems like it took me a little longer than expected to share it, but behold! 🙂

I am glad to announce that I will be mentoring a workshop with Satoru Murata in Maine March 28-29.
You will learn how to shoot and process unique and breathtaking long exposure seascape photography, and we will visit 5 of the most iconic lighthouses of the Portland and Rockland areas.
This workshop is supported by some of the major players in the industry: @Sony, Formatt-Hitech, SmugMug, Mirex and HCam.de, so be prepared for some surprises!

Places are limited to 8 in order to give you the best experience possible, and the first two to register will have a 10% discount.
Attendees are welcome to register to any or both days of the workshop.
Sunrise and sunset options are also available.

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So check out the details and program here:
http://www.thibaultroland.com/Workshops
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And don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have questions!

For examples of what subjects we will shoot, take a look at my series:
http://www.thibaultroland.com/Beacon-of-Hope

Please feel free to share, thanks!

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Feature on Pullitzer Prize winner Brian Smith’s blog

brian_smith_featureI you want to learn more about my photography and the techniques and gear I use, check out the great feature that Brian Smith did of my work on his blog:

http://briansmith.com/long-exposure-photography-thibault-roland/

In this feature, I talk about my beloved Sony a7R camera and the different lenses I use, ranging from Canon to Mamiya and Voigtländer. I also show my setup when taking tilt shift photographs and point you to the different adapters you can use to turn “old” medium format lenses into fully manual and inexpensive tilt shift beauties 🙂

If you have questions on any of these aspects, please don’t hesitate to ask you questions below or on Brian’s blog!

Have a good read!

PS: of course, if you don’t know Brian’s work yet, please check it out ASAP!